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HWP 2016-17 | October 10th, 2016 - July 8th, 2017

Head Above Water
Led by Resident Professor Ghalya Saadawi and Resident Advisor Joe Namy

Workshops taught by Visiting Professors Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Cevdet Erek, Maha Maamoun and Metahaven

With Seminar modules: Listening, seeing, writing, moving | Histories of the artist | Technologies, life and the future | Financialization


Image: Joe Namy untitled (AMOLED exposure series), 2014

Downloadable material Open Studios brochure En & AR

ABOUT HEAD ABOVE WATER

Head Above Water, the 6th edition of the Home Workspace Program (2016-17), is organised around a series of weekly seminars offered by a number of Guest Professors, five workshops led by Visiting Professors Cevdet Erek, Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Maha Maamoun and Metahaven, three Group Critiques, and end of year Open Studios. The year begins with a Preface led by Ali Cherri.

Joe Namy is the year’s Resident Advisor (RA). The RA is a mentor and tutor to the HWP fellows, and coordinator of the Group Critique sessions and the Open Studios.

The course of seminars runs weekly throughout the 10-month period and is organized along four interconnected nodes that deal with, among other things, text, image, sound, movement and interdisciplinarity in Seeing, listening, writing, moving; the geopolitics and genealogies of the category of the artist in Histories of the artist; the histories of our relationships to, and the conditions and effects of life and the future under ‘technologies’ in an expanded sense, are elaborated in Technologies, life and the future; and Financialization introduces primary terms, and examines the formations of capital and its manifold instruments, which channel the distribution of energies, materials and power.

Joe Namy is a composer and media artist. His work often addresses identity, memory, power, and currents encoded in organized sound/music, such as the politics and gender dynamics of bass, the color and tones of militarization, or the migration and asylum patterns of musical instruments. His work has been exhibited, screened, and amplified at the Asia Culture Center in Gwangju, the Berlinale, the Brooklyn Museum, the Beirut Art Center, the Detroit Science Center, and less prominent international dance floors. Some of his projects fall under the sound art platform titled Electric Kahraba, an experimental radio program that operates out of clocktower.org.
PROGRAM
Preface
Ali Cherri | October 10th - 29th, 2016
Workshop 1 | November 7th - 30th, 2016
Visiting Professor Cevdet Erek
Group Critiques | January 9th -13th, 2017
Workshop 3 | March 13th - 27th, 2017
Visiting Professor Lawrence Abu Hamdan
Workshop 4 | March 28th - April 7th, 2017
Visiting Professor Maha Maamoun
Group Critiques | April 24th - 28th, 2017
Workshop 5 | May 15th - June 7th, 2017
Visiting Professor Metahaven
Group Critiques | June 21nd - 23rd , 2017

Upcoming Elsewhere & Around

Sami Müller: Painter of Clay ...
Jun - Sep 2018

Sami Müller: Painter of Clay | Sami MüllerDate: June 1 – September 24, 2018 Location: Sursock Museum Samir Müller (1959-2013) was a painter who used clay for canvas, engobe for pigment, and his fingers for brushes. His ceramic paintings include abstract landscapes, dancing figures on globular vases, and urban scenes in which human silhouettes haunt the streets of Beirut. Adept at rendering […]
Chou Hayda | Annabel Daou and ...
May - Dec 2018

Chou Hayda | Annabel Daou and the People of BeirutIn November of 2017, people from across Beirut came to the National Museum and gave their voices to a number of objects in the collection. The people spoke to and for and about these objects from the past, and, in doing so, they revealed fragments of the present. They did not attempt to disclose a […]
Transposition | Talar Aghbashi...
Apr - Aug 2018

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